How to stop your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a face mask

Depending on what you’re doing when your glasses fog up, you won’t be able to see well, which could be a little inconvenience or a severe concern, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some of us have found it difficult. And here’s the worst part: the annoyance that builds as you wipe your glasses off repeatedly throughout the day. We’re already grappling with pandemic-like forces. Isn’t it true that we don’t need foggy glasses on top of everything else? One solution to this is to wear contact lenses, and you can get contact lenses in Sri Lanka conveniently and easily through many reputed stores.

Here’s how it works in basic terms. Condensation can happen when warm air collides with a cold surface. When heated air leaves through the top of the mask, it condenses on the lenses of your glasses, causing them to fog. What can you do to make sure this doesn’t happen again? When you are purchasing spectacles, are you sure that they are efficient enough to not fog? Here are a few suggestions to get you started.

Seal the mask:

Sticking a piece of double-sided tape over the bridge of the nose before putting on a mask is a popular method used by doctors.

Make sure the mask is comfortable to wear:

A loose-fitting mask directs exhaled air directly toward your spectacles. If the mask is properly placed, it can significantly reduce the amount of hot air that reaches the lenses.

Soapy water should be used to clean the lenses:

Immediately wipe your lenses with soapy water and shake off the excess liquid with this method. Allow your spectacles to air dry or gently wipe them clean with a soft cloth before putting them back on. A tiny coating of soap is left behind, which works as a fog barrier.

Use antifog lens spray:

Antifog sprays can coat your glasses with a see-through coating that prevents fog from forming. Most opticians provide an antifog lens spray when you purchase spectacles online in Sri Lanka, for convenience.

Unfortunately, there is no magic trick that will prevent fogging, such as putting on the mask or glasses first. The best method is to improve the fit around the contours of the nose and cheeks.

Who is a Foodie?

It refers to someone who has a passionate interest in all things related to food. The term became popular somewhere in the 1980’s, and it has stuck around to date, with many people calling themselves foodies as they comment, review and post pictures related to food served in restaurants and cafes, on their blogs and social media channels.

Many restaurants too now know this term and are looking at influencers who call themselves foodies to help make their brand visible to different audiences. Whether it is a chef wearing his elegant white chef coat or an efficient server clad in their waist apron, everyone who works in a restaurant are well aware of what a foodie influencer can do for their business, and try their best to impress them with the food and service served.

“Foodies” have a lot of power to either make or break a restaurant, because these types of influencers are followed by thousands of food enthusiasts who trust their recommendations and have faith in their opinions about restaurants, as well as dishes.

So, if you want to be known as a Foodie, then you need to have the following:

Be able to recommend local restaurants and eateries.
Give information about how each different restaurant uses local ingredients.
Give you information on which dishes are made fresh at the restaurant and which are not.
They generally know about the dishes being served, and do not require waiters and servers to explain the menu to them.
They are usually able to recommend the ideal drinks to be paired with a dish.
They always have a “best” list of eateries, cuisines, chefs, dishes etc.

How are professional chefs coping with the changes brought about by Covid-19?

More than anything it impacted the work force in a huge way, especially those industries such as hospitality and food service.

While the pandemic and country-wide lockdowns closed down restaurants and hotels, and locked out chefs and other staff, it was a time where people reflected and wondered about what would come next. These people who were used to a busy life, with their chef whites and cook shirts on, working almost twelve to fifteen hours a day during busy times, suddenly found themselves with nothing to do.

Many people, left with nothing to keep them occupied, even went into severe depression, while others tried their best to make most of the situation, like spending more time with their families at home (which they did not get while working), or even starting their own ventures such as food delivery. Many offered their services to provide meals and service to frontline workers who were working tirelessly during the pandemic. Some restauranteurs even kept their businesses open, preparing food for delivery orders as well as helping out those in need, so that they ensured their staff would not be out of a job.

Some chefs, especially those who operated their own restaurants, took off their fancy Toques and put on their thinking caps, coming up with revolutionary ideas to implement when the country opened up again and they would be able to serve customers in their restaurants. There certainly was a general understanding that things would never be the same as they were before, hence they knew that the business of operating a restaurant or other eatery would take a 180-degree turnaround to accommodate new rules and regulations in terms of safety, cleanliness and hygiene.

Some chefs even went as far as creating inspirational videos and session for those who needed it, and worked for many other social causes as well.

However almost everyone has survived this unexpected situation in their own way, and we are sure are looking forward to days when things will go back to the days when they will have guests to greet and serve and cook for in their restaurants.

Interpretation Perfected by Presentation – the Berlin Mendelssohn Trio in Palau Altea, Altea, Spain

One of the great, even reassuring, things about what the CD shops ignorantly label “Classical Music” is its freedom, its liberality, its democratic principles. Yes, it has its stars. Yes, it has its forms and conventions. But in “Classical Music” these aspects never dominate. The music is always the prime focus. Anyone can learn any piece, anyone can play it, and anyone is free to interpret the composer’s intentions – as long as those intentions are respected, of course. And all of this is done unencumbered by wires, microphones or amplification, since real sound and real experience are always the goal. Performance, therefore, becomes a form of communication, a presentation of the music, itself, plus often much more. Contrast that with some other genres where commerce and celebrity are the raisons d’être, where the music is merely a secondary, often irrelevant accompaniment. Never mind the quality of the lip-sync, feel the width of the show.

Critics of “Classical Music” often cite a lack of bravura on behalf of the performers. This, of course, is to misunderstand both the medium and the content, since the passion is always in the music and good performances should always highlight the music, not themselves. Not all performers perform well, of course, but then that is true of every staged activity, not least of other genres of music than “Classical”.

So when a performer is exceptional both in terms of interpretation and delivery, an occasional flaw or inaccuracy passes by unnoticed. So it was with the Berlin Mendelssohn Trio in Palau Altea, not that there were many flaws to pass by. They offered their audience seven pieces, including an encore, one of which did indeed happen to be “classical” and four of which were presented as a single item, not really because the composer necessarily intended it, but because it made musical sense. The commitment and energy that the group displayed was quite remarkable.

They opened with Beethoven’s Opus 11 trio. If Schubert always sings, then Beethoven usually dances, and this trio hopped and pranced with energy, always, of course, with Beethoven’s musical tension showing through.