Interpretation Perfected by Presentation – the Berlin Mendelssohn Trio in Palau Altea, Altea, Spain

One of the great, even reassuring, things about what the CD shops ignorantly label “Classical Music” is its freedom, its liberality, its democratic principles. Yes, it has its stars. Yes, it has its forms and conventions. But in “Classical Music” these aspects never dominate. The music is always the prime focus. Anyone can learn any piece, anyone can play it, and anyone is free to interpret the composer’s intentions – as long as those intentions are respected, of course. And all of this is done unencumbered by wires, microphones or amplification, since real sound and real experience are always the goal. Performance, therefore, becomes a form of communication, a presentation of the music, itself, plus often much more. Contrast that with some other genres where commerce and celebrity are the raisons d’être, where the music is merely a secondary, often irrelevant accompaniment. Never mind the quality of the lip-sync, feel the width of the show.

Critics of “Classical Music” often cite a lack of bravura on behalf of the performers. This, of course, is to misunderstand both the medium and the content, since the passion is always in the music and good performances should always highlight the music, not themselves. Not all performers perform well, of course, but then that is true of every staged activity, not least of other genres of music than “Classical”.

So when a performer is exceptional both in terms of interpretation and delivery, an occasional flaw or inaccuracy passes by unnoticed. So it was with the Berlin Mendelssohn Trio in Palau Altea, not that there were many flaws to pass by. They offered their audience seven pieces, including an encore, one of which did indeed happen to be “classical” and four of which were presented as a single item, not really because the composer necessarily intended it, but because it made musical sense. The commitment and energy that the group displayed was quite remarkable.

They opened with Beethoven’s Opus 11 trio. If Schubert always sings, then Beethoven usually dances, and this trio hopped and pranced with energy, always, of course, with Beethoven’s musical tension showing through.

Superstars Negotiate to Win – Do You? – Negotiation Lessons Learned From LeBron James’ Situation

For those that aren’t aware, LeBron James is a basketball player mega superstar. When superstars negotiate, they’re afforded a certain negotiation latitude. So, who can fault LeBron James for taking control of an advantage he had when negotiating? When you’re in a ‘power’ position, that’s the time to ‘push’ your agenda forward.

Most savvy negotiators know how and when to advance their negotiation position. Are you aware of the times in which you hold advantages in a negotiation, and how to utilize those advantages?

This article examines the negotiation pros and cons of what occurred when LeBron James negotiated for his freedom. In it are negotiation lessons from which you can increase your negotiation skills. By the way, don’t lynch the author for saying LeBron negotiated his freedom. By freedom, it is meant, the pursuit of his dreams.

Be Fearless:

  • When you’re fearful about negotiating, think about the outcome and weigh what you seek to achieve versus settling for what you have. If the odds are in your favor to stride forward, do so. Be courageous. After all, courage is nothing more than possessing the judgment to realize that something else is more important than fear. (LeBron tossed naysayer comments to the wind in seeking the path he felt best served the outcome he sought.)

Understand the ‘value proposition’ in the negotiation:

· Sometimes, money is not the deciding factor in a negotiation. Thus, if you’re focusing on dollars to solve a negotiation problem and the other negotiator is seeking another form of resolution, chances are the negotiation will not come to fruition. When you’re at an impasse, understand the root cause of that impasse and address that point of contention. (The management of the Cavs (LeBron’s former team), thought money would be the deciding factor that would keep LeBron in Cleveland, which turned out not to be a major factor in LeBron’s decision.)

Reframe a ‘point of contention’ to one that’s more favorable to your position:

· Cav’s management shifted the inference of the conversation, related to LeBron leaving Cleveland, to one of the pain that such action would cause the city. They didn’t highlight the fact that LeBron had fulfilled his contractual agreement, and thus was ‘free’ to explore other avenues. To do so would have weakened their position, as they played to the sympathy of the public.

Consequences: There will always be consequences to the actions you take. Weigh them and proceed accordingly.

· Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley and a host of former NBA (National Basketball Association) players, and non-superstars have derided LeBron’s decision to leave the Cavs. Nevertheless, LeBron, knowing the desire he had to play for a team that could win a championship has pushed all the negative rhetoric aside to follow his desires. (When you’re sure about the direction in which you’re going, go on! Since you’re the one that will have to endure the consequences, follow the path that suits your interest for the negotiation.)

Expand the scope of the negotiation:

When seeking leverage in a negotiation, consider expanding the negotiation to metaphorically include parties that will be affected by negative or positive actions, based on the outcome you seek. (i.e. The owners of the Cavs brought up the fact that Cleveland’s economy and its people would be negatively impacted, if LeBron left the team). They were attempting to make the situation affect a broader segment of people. In so doing, they wanted to increase the perceived level of pain that would be inflicted upon the people of the city.

When you negotiate, after weighing all the options of a potential outcome, if you’re prepared to incur the consequences and you wish to go forth, ‘go for it’. Do so with all the zest and zeal you can muster. Fret not about ‘what could have been’. You’re the person in charge of your destiny. If you fall short in the negotiation, just remember, sometimes, that’s the way the ball bounces… and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

· Utilize your negotiation power when you’re powerful in a negotiation. To allow it to wane is to forgo an advantage. Even if you chose not to use it, let the other negotiator know that you realized you had an advantage and chose to forgo utilizing it. In so doing you still gain mental credit with him for having it.

· Consider ‘playing the victim’ when placed in a precarious negotiation position. The owners of the Cavs cried ‘wounded’ when LeBron was considering playing for another team. They lamented, “how could LeBron leave us after all we’ve done for him”. In a negotiation, sympathy can beget interest. Just be careful how you utilize it.

· When you negotiate, there will be times when you’ll have to lead with your head and other times when you’ll have to lead with your heart. Regardless to which you choose, do so confidently. It’s your life and not another soul can experience the sorrows and joys that you experience, except you.

Some Information Regarding Chania’s Past And Present

One can travel to a number of scenic places across Greece to spend holidays there. Chania, the second largest city of the Greek Island Crete, is among many such locations. We are going to quickly look at some interesting information regarding Chania’s past and present to know why it was seen with awe in the tourism annals. Holidaying in Chania is made affordable, easy and full of excitement due to the vast range of tourism packages available for staying there. Several accommodation plans, which includes staying at among the hoards of self-catering apartments in Chania, along with the rest others, makes part of many such tour packages.

Chania is thought to be settled by the humans since the Neolithic times before being ruled by several known empires. It was the place where the Minoan settlement took place – remains of the Minoan city were excavated during the last hundred years beneath the ground where the district of Kasteli stands right now. The first settlers from the mainland Greece were the Dorian Greeks who landed in Cydonia, another name for the Minoan settlement, in around 1100 BC. The place was governed by the Byzantine rule from 395 – 824 AD and subsequently by the Arabs, who gave it the name Chania. Byzantine Empire, which was the cause of spread of Christianity in the region, came back to power in 961 AD. Later, the area went under the Venetian and Ottoman rules as well.

During the modern times, Eleftherios Venizelos, who was born and brought up in Chania, led an uprising in the years 1896-97 to oust the then existent Ottoman rule. He went on to become the Greek Prime Minister and was well regarded for his statesmanship in the entire world. He was given a state burial across one of the scenic hills overlooking Chania, after his demise. The city was made capital of the semi-autonomous Cretan state in the year 1898, under the aegis of Prince George of Greece. This was the time when Chania was beginning to have a cosmopolitan and modern outlook, and many new buildings were being built around. Plenty of intellectual and artistic activities were taking place as well and the state was fully supportive to all those involved. Several consulates and embassies of that period could still be found standing as it is even today. Incidentally, apartments in Chania around these historic locations are among the most sought after ones.

The invasion and occupation of Chania by Adolf Hitler’s army during the Word War II is yet another significant aspect of its modern history. The British army, as part of the allied forces, gave stiff resistance to the advancing German fire power and made them retreat in 1941. However, Chania did have to go through the human and material damage, which was reminiscent of the painful events of the World War II. A significant number of its human population was either executed and imprisoned or forced to go into an exile. The later years saw Chania quickly regaining its lost glory back though, and the war imprints had evaporated significantly. Since the 1970s the Cretan tourism began soaring up high, and Chania was brought to the attention of the world for the very first time.

Today’s Chania is a great composition of traditional Greek and cosmopolitan values. The traditional Greek aspect floats mainly around one’s family life, and it may be witnessed flourishing across Chania during the winter months. However, the summer transforms this state of affairs substantially as tourists begin pouring in from all over the globe. A wide range of food choices, including that of the Greek tavernas, some traditional Cretan specialties and plenty of foreign cuisines, could be found at offer across, both old and new townships. However, many of these are presently stationed mainly in and around the old township only. The old township does also carry many bars and cafes, which are beautifully carved into the remains of the Venetian era.