What Can Make Or Break Your PowerPoint Presentation

At a workshop recently I heard someone giving a talk which was really interesting and I took away some valuable points from it. So it got me thinking about what makes a good presentation. Now, I’ve designed a lot of PowerPoint presentations in my time but I’ve delivered very few of them. Like a lot of people, the thought of standing up in front of a group makes me nervous. However, others can stand up for an hour and speak off the cuff about their subject, and make it interesting and memorable. How do they do it? OK, there are a few people who are natural public speakers, but for most of us, it takes a lot of preparation to stand up and speak clearly and concisely about our subject.

So from my experience of both creating and listening to presentations, I’ve put together some tips of what I think can make or break a presentation.

Do

  • Rehearse your speech and ideally get someone to listen to you or record yourself.
  • Use humour and a personal story to open the presentation but be appropriate.
  • Know the message you are trying to get across and stick to the key points.
  • Keep the colour scheme simple and ensure the text is readable against the background.
  • Have the same slide design throughout the whole presentation.
  • Put your company branding and logo on the presentation to make it look professional and help build a relationship with your brand and the audience.
  • Keep animations and transitions to a minimum so they don’t confuse and distract the audience.
  • Use creative ways of presenting your information eg, pictures, charts, and animations which will grab people’s attention.

Don’t

  • Speak without any preparation or notes unless you’ve done it successfully before.
  • Start the presentation without checking that everyone can hear you.
  • Don’t wander off the subject, and if you do, ensure the audience knows why and quickly come back to it.
  • Use technical language, acronyms or jargon unless it is relevant for your audience.
  • Read from a script – it can sound stilted and prevents you from making eye contact with the audience.
  • Put everything you want to say on the PowerPoint slide and then just read it out.
  • Overload the slide with too much graphics or animation. They should be used to make the message clearer not confuse the audience.
  • Use different formatting and colour schemes on each slide.

Perhaps you have other tips to add to the list? However, it’s important to remember that a clearly delivered and well-designed presentation will promote you and your business professionally and effectively to your audience.

Who is a Foodie?

It refers to someone who has a passionate interest in all things related to food. The term became popular somewhere in the 1980’s, and it has stuck around to date, with many people calling themselves foodies as they comment, review and post pictures related to food served in restaurants and cafes, on their blogs and social media channels.

Many restaurants too now know this term and are looking at influencers who call themselves foodies to help make their brand visible to different audiences. Whether it is a chef wearing his elegant white chef coat or an efficient server clad in their waist apron, everyone who works in a restaurant are well aware of what a foodie influencer can do for their business, and try their best to impress them with the food and service served.

“Foodies” have a lot of power to either make or break a restaurant, because these types of influencers are followed by thousands of food enthusiasts who trust their recommendations and have faith in their opinions about restaurants, as well as dishes.

So, if you want to be known as a Foodie, then you need to have the following:

Be able to recommend local restaurants and eateries.
Give information about how each different restaurant uses local ingredients.
Give you information on which dishes are made fresh at the restaurant and which are not.
They generally know about the dishes being served, and do not require waiters and servers to explain the menu to them.
They are usually able to recommend the ideal drinks to be paired with a dish.
They always have a “best” list of eateries, cuisines, chefs, dishes etc.

Stylish Present Ideas by a Lifestyle Editor

Choosing presents is like a competition. Some people are brilliant, displaying Olympian levels of ingenuity and originality. And others? Well, it’s the thought that counts, isn’t it? But there are ways to turn yourself into a gold medal present-giver, even if you’re one of life’s last-to-be-picked for the team when it comes to present ideas.

It was all so easy in the days when a box of chocolates or a bunch of flowers were all anyone ever gave. No-one questioned your taste because ‘style’ had still to be invented.

Nowadays there’s almost too much choice. Hi-tech gadgets, silken fripperies, lotions, potions and perfumes, all turn present buying into a fraught activity. Will they like it? Have you misjudged their taste? Have you misjudged your own? Will they be impressed by your accurate assessment of their personality, or wonder why you and they are actually friends?

So, how to avoid misfires and wow everyone with your brilliant present ideas? Rule number one is never to buy something just because you like it. It’s their likes and dislikes that count. And, in order to work out what the recipient might like, there really is nothing for it but to note down their “I wish I had that’s”, all year round, keep in a safe place, and look up when necessary.

This process, by the way, doesn’t just mean buying what they don’t already have. The keen cook may actually enjoy chopping and slicing and not want the process smoothed with a food processor. The woman who doesn’t have pierced ears may not be waiting for the perfect pair of earrings. And the Chanel No 5 lady won’t want a bottle of new scent (but might be thrilled with a scented candle). Whatever you do buy, always, always make it a treat because the best present ideas of all are indulgent.

If you really are stuck for present ideas then don’t buy classics but sneak in an original twist. Instead of a bunch of flowers, give a perfect pink palaeonopsis orchid. Instead of ordinary chocs give a box of hand-made truffles by a cult chocolatier. Make bubblebath chic by adding a bar of heavenly scented soap, a loofah and body oil, then tie up the lot in a hamman towel.

And don’t forget that the perfect present idea may actually be an obvious one. A friend of mine loves nothing more than candles – for her, any candle is gratefully received, no matter how lowly its pedigree. But, whatever the present, always wrap it beautifully because even the humblest gift looks special tied with generous lengths of velvet ribbon.

They do say that it is better to give than to receive. That’s nonsense, of course. But it can be a lot of fun.